Fireworks, Dancing, and 150-lbs of Shrimp!

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On July 4th beginning at 8:00 pm, the Lincoln County Historical Society invites all to an Independence Day Celebration at the Pacific Maritime Heritage Center.

The second annual family friendly fundraiser includes unmatched views of the Bayfront fireworks and dancing to local Jazz band, Past Forward. Goodies will be served too, of course, and this year thanks to generous donations from local shrimpers, we’ll be kicking it up a notch with fresh shrimp cocktail! In addition, attendees will have access to all current exhibits at the museum including the newly opened shipwrecks exhibit now on display in the main floor gallery.

Past Forward

For this special event the popular Great Room will be cleared out for music and dancing. Seating will be set up on the deck (weather permitting) for the best fireworks view anywhere. Past Forward will begin playing at 8:00 and break for the fireworks. When the fireworks conclude they will resume playing, so guests can be entertained for a while until the notorious Bayfront post-fireworks traffic eases up.

Proceeds from this celebratory evening will go towards renovation of the Maritime Center, currently in its second phase, which will feature the much anticipated Doerfler Family Theatre. Admission to the fundraiser is Adults: $20 Member, $25 Non-Member, Kids 12 and under: $10 Member, $15 Non-Member. Tickets are available for purchase at The Burrows House Museum and Maritime Center, by phone, or at the door.

Parking will be at an absolute premium for this event, and attendees are encouraged to walk, bicycle, car pool, or catch a cab to the Bayfront. Because this is a fundraiser, there will be no discounts or free admissions. For more information, or to buy tickets by phone, call 541-265-7509. To learn more about Past Forward, visit their website at JazzPastForward.com

Thomas Condon and His Fossils

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On Sunday, June 14th, from 5:00 to 6:00 pm,
Bob Hart, executive director of the Lane County Historical Society, will bring to life pioneering Oregon geologist, professor Thomas Condon.

Famed geologist Condon had a local connection. Condon taught “SEA Classes” at Nye Beach, lecturing about Oregon coast fossils and geological features for Oregon’s Summer Education Association.

Thomas Condon (1822–1907) minister, geologist, and paleontologist, immigrated from Ireland in 1833. After graduating from theological seminary in 1852, he traveled to Oregon. While working as a minister at The Dalles, he became interested in fossils. Condon found fossilized camels and other animals, and many of his discoveries are in the present-day John Day Fossil Beds National Monument. Condon provided many specimens to major museums.

Condon became Oregon’s first State Geologist in 1872, then University of Oregon’s first professor of geology. In 1902 he wrote, The Two Islands and What Came of Them, a geology book about two widely separated regions of Oregon containing its oldest rocks, the Klamath Mountains and the Blue Mountains.

Bob Hart, an avid history “junkie,” has worked in presentation of history and historic sites since 1977. Author of several historical articles, Bob has also authored or co-written five nominations for the National Register of Historic Places, and contributed to major studies of Oregon’s history.

Admission to this event is free for members, and $5 for non-members. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call (541) 265-7509.

A special Thank You goes out to The Whaler in Newport for their generous help in bringing this program to the Maritime Center.

Author Bill Hall to speak at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center

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On Sunday, April 26th, from 5:00 to 7:00 pm, author Bill Hall will be on hand at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center to give a talk and sign copies of his new book, “McCallandia.”

McCallandia is a novel of alternative history based on the premise that Tom McCall became Richard Nixon’s successor as President of the United States. Readers will see history change when McCall brings his candor and environmental ethic to Washington. In addition to the very memorable McCall, McCallandia features a cast of outsized supporting personalities: Richard Nixon, Hunter S. Thompson, John Lennon, Ken Kesey, Steve Prefontaine and many others.

Lincoln County Commissioner Bill Hall is the author of McCallandia, which is based on 40 years of admiration for Tom McCall and was the product of extensive research and numerous interviews. An Oregon native, Hall spent many years in journalism before making the transition to elective office. He was a volunteer in McCall’s 1978 comeback campaign and met the former governor several times.

Admission to this event is free for members, and $5 for non-members. Refreshments will be served. The book is available for purchase at both Lincoln County Historical Society Museums. For more information, call (541) 265-7509.

We’re Talkin’ Gyotaku!

Gyotaku artist, Bruce Koike, at work in his studio.

A new exhibit at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center brings to life the vibrant art of Gyotaku, a Japanese word that roughly translates as “Fish Printing.”

On Sunday, March 29th, from 4:30 to 6:00 pm, guest curator Bruce Koike will be sharing history of the art form, techniques, and materials. Koike will also lead a tour through the exhibit, and demonstrate his Gyotaku skills.

Having grown up in San Diego, fish and fishing have always been part of Bruce’s life. His passion for the ocean brought him to the Oregon State University Hatfield Marine Science Center in the mid 1980s to earn a Masters degree in Fisheries Science. During this time, Bruce first attempted and developed in the art of Gyotaku. After his graduation, Bruce worked at the Aquarium of the Americas in New Orleans.

Bruce obtains specimens from his public aquarium colleagues, research scientists, Asian fish markets, commercial fishers, recreational anglers and has, on occasion, been successful at catching a specimen or two. He has printed over 150 different species of aquatic animals including fish, seaweed, crab, clam, octopus, and squid.

The Gyotaku exhibit runs through September 6th, 2015, and features the collective works of Bruce Koike, Leighton Blackwell, John Buchanan, Heather J Fortner, and Marion Moir. Many of the pieces are available for purchase with proceeds benefiting the Maritime Center.

Admission to this event is free for members, and $5 for non-members. Kids 12 and under get in free. Refreshments will be served. For more information, call (541) 265-7509.

There’s More Than One Way To Capture A Fish

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Quillback with otoliths Gyotaku print by Bruce Koike

A new exhibit featuring the work of five local Gyotaku artists is now open at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center.

Housed in the Maritime Center’s “Galley Gallery,” the collective works of Bruce Koike, Leighton Blackwell, John Buchanan, Heather J Fortner, and Marion Moir represent a diversity of Gyotaku styles and techniques.

Gyotaku is a Japanese word that roughly translates as “Fish Printing.” To make a fish print, the actual fish is directly coated with ink then pressed onto paper, making it possible for the artist to obtain a detailed reverse image.

Guest curator, Bruce Koike, explained how Gyotaku reflects the design and beauty of fish: Gyotaku is the perfect medium to reflect the dynamics of aquatic life. Gyotaku can highlight the individual fish, illustrate interactions of multiple fish, or illustrate the specific habitat where the animal lives.

Many of the 21 pieces on exhibit are available for purchase with the proceeds benefiting the Maritime Center.

An opening reception for the artists and exhibit will be held at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center on Friday, February 27th, from 5:00 to 7:00 pm.

The reception is being sponsored by Local Ocean Seafoods, and will include seafood hors d’oeuvres and a no host wine bar. Admission to this special event is free for members, and $5 for non-members.

The exhibit runs through September 6th, 2015.