There’s More Than One Way To Capture A Fish

Gyotaku Print

Quillback with otoliths Gyotaku print by Bruce Koike

A new exhibit featuring the work of five local Gyotaku artists is now open at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center.

Housed in the Maritime Center’s “Galley Gallery,” the collective works of Bruce Koike, Leighton Blackwell, John Buchanan, Heather J Fortner, and Marion Moir represent a diversity of Gyotaku styles and techniques.

Gyotaku is a Japanese word that roughly translates as “Fish Printing.” To make a fish print, the actual fish is directly coated with ink then pressed onto paper, making it possible for the artist to obtain a detailed reverse image.

Guest curator, Bruce Koike, explained how Gyotaku reflects the design and beauty of fish: Gyotaku is the perfect medium to reflect the dynamics of aquatic life. Gyotaku can highlight the individual fish, illustrate interactions of multiple fish, or illustrate the specific habitat where the animal lives.

Many of the 21 pieces on exhibit are available for purchase with the proceeds benefiting the Maritime Center.

An opening reception for the artists and exhibit will be held at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center on Friday, February 27th, from 5:00 to 7:00 pm.

The reception is being sponsored by Local Ocean Seafoods, and will include seafood hors d’oeuvres and a no host wine bar. Admission to this special event is free for members, and $5 for non-members.

The exhibit runs through September 6th, 2015.

Kids Get In Free at the Maritime Center

ChildrenandToys
HAPPY HOLIDAYS!

For the remainder of the month of December, children age 12 and under will be admitted for free to the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center with a paid adult admission or a adult member
free pass.

The Maritime Center offers a children’s discovery area where young ones can get up close and personal with our “hands on history” interactive exhibit. They can even make their own exhibit, explore photos and maps, and try on vintage clothing. Touching is very much encouraged in the hands on area.

Normally, children’s admission is $3.00. Adults and children alike can also take in the new “Making Waves” surfing exhibit and “Yaquina,” a retrospective exhibit of Michael Gibbons paintings of the Yaquina Bay estuary.

The Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center is open Thursday through Sunday, 11:00 am – 4:00 pm, and is located at 333 SE Bay Blvd on Newport’s Historic Bayfront. Closed Christmas Day. For more information, call 541-265-7509.

COWABUNGA!

Cowabunga!

Cowabunga Longboard Classic, Otter Rock, 1983. Photo by Scott Blackman

Making Waves
Pioneer Surfers of the Oregon Coast

An engaging and nostalgic exhibit on Oregon Coast surfing, surfer culture, and the pioneers who made it happen opens at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center on Thursday, October 23rd.

For centuries, surfing was central to ancient Polynesian culture. It was “discovered” by European explorers in the late 1700s. The first written account of surfing in Hawaii appears in the journals of Captain James Cook. Cook describes with envy the pleasure experienced by these early surfer dudes, December 1777.

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Yaquina Art Exhibit Opening at Maritime Center

"Arnold Creek Estuary"

“ARNOLD CREEK ESTUARY” oil painting of the Yaquina watershed by Michael Gibbons

A travelling exhibit of 35 oil paintings by Michael Gibbons, Toledo, will be on display at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center beginning Thursday, October 9th. The artist will be present throughout the day from 11:00 am to 4:00 pm, and invites everyone to stop by and see his unique views of the Yaquina watershed.

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Coastal Curiosities: An exhibit of the Strange, Unfamiliar, and Seldom Seen

Mr and Mrs Rare Button

Mr. and Mrs. Rare Button, a postcard reproduction from Wecoma, Oregon,
which is now part of Lincoln City.

The head of an angry wolf eel, shipwrecks, wax that generates music, a shell in a bottle, mysterious copper hardware and a multitude of other strange, unfamiliar, and seldom seen objects are now on exhibit at the Lincoln County Historical Society’s Burrows House Museum. Stylistically, this exhibit is in the traditional style of the curiosity cabinet of old.
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